Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

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dc.title Their Eyes Were Watching God
dc.creator Hurston, Zora Neale, 1891-1960
dc.subject Racism; Marriage-Fiction; Southern States; African American Women LCSH
dc.description An extended flashback as the main character, Janie, tells the story of her life. She goes through marriages to three different men, the last of which was finally a happy one, while dealing with violence and racism as an African-American woman in the early 1900’s South.
dc.publisher Harper Perennial Modern Classics
dc.contributor Henry Louis Gates Jr.; Edwidge Danticat
dc.date 05-30-2006 W3CDTF
dc.type Text DCMIType
dc.format Paperback book, 219 pages, 5.5 x 0.6 x 8.2 in.
dc.identifier ISBN-13 978-0061120060
dc.source http://www.amazon.com/Their-Eyes-Were-Watching-God/dp/0061120065/ref=sr_1_1_twi_pap_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1461872392&sr=1-1&keywords=their+eyes+were+watching+god+book
dc.language en-US RFC4646
dc.relation Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston; originally published by J. B.
Lippincott; Philadelphia: September 18, 1937
dc.rights Zora Neale Hurston

Janie tells a friend the story of her life and struggles throughout her three marriages, beginning when she is sixteen and ending in her forties after losing her third husband. This is generally banned from high schools due to language and sexually explicit content, as well as some violence between Janie and her husbands.

http://www.ala.org/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks/classics/reasons

Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell

Element Value Value Standard
dc.title Gone With the Wind
dc.creator Mitchell, Margaret, 1900-1949
dc.subject Coming of age- Fiction; Slavery;  Slavery in Literature; United States–History–Civil War, 1861-1865 LCSH
dc.description In this “epic novel of love and war,” Scarlett O’Hara, the spoiled daughter of a plantation owner, must survive on her own and find a way out of poverty in the Civil War South.
dc.publisher Macmillan
dc.date 1964 W3CDTF
dc.type Text DCMIType
dc.format Hardcover book, 833 pages, 8.5 x 5.9 x 1.9 in.
dc.identifier ISBN-13 978-0025853904
dc.source http://www.amazon.com/Gone-Wind-Margaret-Mitchell/dp/B000GISOGS/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1461871698&sr=8-5&keywords=gone+with+the+wind
dc.language en-US RFC4646
dc.relation Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell; originally published by Macmillan Publishers; New York: June 10, 1936
dc.rights Margaret Mitchell

Gone with the Wind follows the struggles of Scarlett O’Hara during and after the Civil War, as well as her on-again, off-again relationships with Ashley Wilkes and Rhett Butler. Many people have the opinion that Gone with the Wind should be banned due to racial slurs, as well as the underlying racism in both the way slaves were treated by the characters and portrayed by the narrative.

http://www.csmonitor.com/Books/2011/0928/20-banned-books-that-may-surprise-you/Gone-with-the-Wind-by-Margaret-Mitchell

https://prezi.com/kdkcv_ww67je/why-is-gone-with-the-wind-banned-and-challenged/

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

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dc.title To Kill a Mockingbird
dc.creator Lee, Harper, 1926-2016
dc.subject Racism, Lawyers, Fathers and daughters, Race relations LCSH
dc.description A young girl experiences prejudice in the South as her father, a lawyer, defends a black man wrongly accused of a crime.
dc.publisher Harper Perennial Modern Classics
dc.date 03-01-2004 W3CDTF
dc.type Text DCMIType
dc.format Paperback book, 385 pages, 1 x 5.2 x 8.2 in.
dc.identifier ISBN-13 978-0060935467
dc.source http://www.amazon.com/Kill-Mockingbird-Harper-Lee/dp/0060935464/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=
dc.language en-US RFC4646
dc.relation To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee; originally published by Lippincott & Co., Philadelphia: July 11, 1960
dc.rights Harper Lee

 

To Kill a Mockingbird shows a young girl learning about prejudice and racism for the first time when her father, a lawyer in their small southern town, defends a black man wrongly accused of rape. It has been challenged or banned consistently since it came out for various reasons. The most common are vulgar language and sexual content, racial slurs, and the idea that it promotes institutionalized racism. Almost 60 years after it was first published, To Kill a Mockingbird remains one of the most commonly banned classic novels.

http://www.ala.org/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks/classics/reasons

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/to-kill-a-mockingbird-remains-among-top-banned-classical-novels/

The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

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dc.title The Catcher in the Rye
dc.creator Salinger, J.D. (Jerome David), 1919-2010
dc.subject Caulfield, Holden (Fictitious character)- Fiction.; Runaway teenagers- Fiction.; New York (N.Y.)- Fiction. LCSH
dc.description Anyone who has read J.D. Salinger’s New Yorker stories–particularly A Perfect Day for Bananafish, Uncle Wiggily in Connecticut, The Laughing Man, and For Esme With Love and Squalor–will not be surprised by the fact that his first novel is full of children. The hero-narrator of The Catcher in the Rye is an ancient child of sixteen, a native New Yorker named Holden Caulfield. Through circumstances that tend to preclude adult, secondhand description, he leaves his prep school in Pennsylvania and goes underground in New York City for three days. The boy himself is at once too simple and too complex for us to make any final comment about him or his story. Perhaps the safest thing we can say about Holden is that he was born in the world not just strongly attracted to beauty but, almost, hopelessly impaled on it.
There are many voices in this novel: children’s voices, adult voices, underground voices-but Holden’s voice is the most eloquent of all. Transcending his own vernacular, yet remaining marvelously faithful to it, he issues a perfectly articulated cry of mixed pain and pleasure. However, like most lovers and clowns and poets of the higher orders, he keeps most of the pain to, and for, himself. The pleasure he gives away, or sets aside, with all his heart. It is there for the reader who can handle it to keep.
dc.publisher Back Bay Books
dc.contributor J.D. Salinger
dc.date 2001-01-30 W3CDTF
dc.type Text DCMIType
dc.format Paperback book; 288 pages; 5.2 x 0.9 x 8 in.
dc.identifier ISBN-13: 978-0316769174 ISBN
dc.source http://www.amazon.com/Catcher-Rye-J-D-Salinger/dp/0316769177/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=
dc.language en-US RFC4646
dc.relation The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger; originally published by Little, Brown, and Company, New York: 1951
dc.coverage 1951-2001
dc.rights All rights reserved

The Catcher in the Rye follows Holden Caulfield’s three-day adventure home after flunking out of his preparatory school. Holden contemplates his life, and during his journey, he meets a variety of people. The novel also deals with complex issues of identity, belonging, loss, and connection. The Catcher in the Rye has been challenged, removed, and banned in my many schools due to a variety of reasons: profanity, obscenity, offensive language, prostitution, and many other reasons (American Library Association, n.d.).

American Library Association. (n.d.). Banned and/or challenged books from the Radcliffe Publishing Course top 100 novels of the 20th Century. Retrieved April 26, 2016, from http://www.ala.org/Template.cfm?Section=bbwlinks

Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson

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dc.title Bridge to Terabithia
dc.creator Paterson, Katherine
dc.subject Friendship- Juvenile fiction.; Death-Juvenile fiction. LCSH
dc.description This Newbery Medal-winning novel by bestselling author Katherine Paterson is a modern classic of friendship and loss. Jess Aarons has been practicing all summer so he can be the fastest runner in the fifth grade. And he almost is, until the new girl in school, Leslie Burke, outpaces him. The two become fast friends and spend most days in the woods behind Leslie’s house, where they invent an enchanted land called Terabithia. One morning, Leslie goes to Terabithia without Jess and a tragedy occurs. It will take the love of his family and the strength that Leslie has given him for Jess to be able to deal with his grief. In addition to being a Newbery Medal winner, Bridge to Terabithia was also named an ALA Notable Children’s Book and has become a touchstone of children’s literature, as have many of Katherine Paterson’s other novels, including The Great Gilly Hopkins and Jacob Have I Loved.
dc.publisher HarperCollins
dc.contributor Katherine Paterson
dc.date 2003-05-06 W3CDTF
dc.type Text DCMIType
dc.format Paperback book; 144 pages; 0.5 x 5.2 x 7.5 in.
dc.identifier ISNB-13: 978-0064401845 ISBN
dc.source http://www.amazon.com/Bridge-Terabithia-Katherine-Paterson/dp/0064401847/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=
dc.language en-US RFC4646
dc.relation Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson; originally published by T.Y. Crowell, New York: 1977
dc.coverage 1977-2003
dc.rights All rights reserved

Bridge to Terabithia stars Jess, a 10-year-old boy, who befriends a student, Leslie. Together they create an imaginary world called Terabithia. They have many adventures together until an accident leaves Jess alone to reign over Terabithia. Bridge to Terabithia was first challenged in Lincoln, Nebraska schools “because it contained ‘profanity’ including the phrase ‘Oh Lord’ and ‘Lord’ used as an expletive” (New Mexico State University Library, 2015). It has been challenged by other school districts for not only offensive language, but also the belief that the material encourages Satanism (American Library Association, n.d.).

American Library Association. (n.d.). Top ten frequently challenged books lists of the 21st century. Retrieved April 27, 2016, from http://www.ala.org/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks/top10

New Mexico State University Library. (2015, December 8). Censorship and banned books. Retrieved April 27, 2016, from http://nmsu.libguides.com/censorship

A Separate Peace by John Knowles

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dc.title A Separate Peace
dc.creator Knowles, John, 1926-2001
dc.subject Preparatory school students- Fiction.; Preparatory schools- Fiction.; Friendship- Fiction.; Death- Fiction.; Boys- Fiction.; New Hampshire- Fiction. LCSH
dc.description An American classic and great bestseller for over thirty years, A Separate Peace is timeless in its description of adolescence during a period when the entire country was losing its innocence to World War II. Set at a boys’ boarding school in New England during the early years of World War II, A Separate Peace is a harrowing and luminous parable of the dark side of adolescence. Gene is a lonely, introverted intellectual. Phineas is a handsome, taunting, daredevil athlete. What happens between the two friends one summer, like the war itself, banishes the innocence of these boys and their world.
dc.publisher Scribner
dc.contributor John Knowles
dc.date 2003-09-30 W3CDTF
dc.type Text DCMIType
dc.format Paperback book; 204 pages; 5.5 x 0.7 x 8.4 in.
dc.identifier ISBN-13: 978-0743253970 ISBN
dc.source http://www.amazon.com/Separate-Peace-John-Knowles/dp/0743253973/ref=tmm_pap_title_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=
dc.language en-US RFC4646
dc.relation A Separate Peace by John Knowles; originally published by Secker & Warburg, London: 1959
dc.coverage 1959-2003
dc.rights All rights reserved

A Separate Peace takes place at a boy’s preparatory school in the 1940s. Gene and Finny, two completely opposite boys, befriend each other, but for Gene, it becomes a rivalry. The rivalry leads to accidents and an eventual death. All the while, the boys are facing the realities of WWII. The book was challenged a few times in the 1980s, with challengers complaining of offensive and graphic language (American Library Association, n.d.).

American Library Association. (n.d.). Banned and/or challenged books from the Radcliffe Publishing Course top 100 novels of the 20th Century. Retrieved April 26, 2016, from http://www.ala.org/Template.cfm?Section=bbwlinks

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

 

 

Element Value Value Standard
dc.title Fahrenheit 451
dc.creator Bradbury, Ray, 1920-2012
dc.subject Censorship—Fiction; Book Burning—Fiction; Totalitarianism—Fiction LCSH
dc.description In a dystopian future America, reading is illegal, books are banned, and firemen don’t put out fires—they burn books.
dc.publisher Simon & Schuster
dc.contributor Ray Bradbury
dc.date 06-01-2013 W3CDTF
dc.type Text DCMIType
dc.format Softcover book, 249 pages, 5.5 x 0.9 x 8.4 in.
dc.identifier ISBN-13 978-1451673319
dc.source http://www.amazon.com/Fahrenheit-451-Novel-Ray-Bradbury/dp/1451673310/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1461604858&sr=8-1&keywords=fahrenheit+451
dc.language en-US RFC4646
dc.relation Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury; originally published by Ballantine Books, New York: 1953
dc.coverage 1953-2013
dc.rights All rights reserved

 

Fireman Guy Montag doesn’t put out fires; his job is to burn books, which are illegal in the future United States. But after meeting his strange teenage neighbour Clarisse, who likes to read, Montag starts to wonder what’s so bad about books. “Fahrenheit 451” was first published in 1953, and has since been frequently challenged due to offensive language and going against people’s religious beliefs (Banned Books Week).

 

Works cited: “Banned Books That Shaped America.” Bannedbooksweek.org. Web. 25 Apr. 2016. http://www.bannedbooksweek.org/censorship/bannedbooksthatshapedamerica

 

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

Element Value Value Standard
dc.title Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
dc.creator Twain, Mark, 1835-1910
dc.subject Runaway children—Fiction; Fugitive slaves—Fiction; Friendship—Fiction; Race relations—Fiction; Mississippi River—Fiction LCSH
dc.description Huck Finn, trying to escape his abusive father, teams up with runaway slave Jim as they raft down the Mississippi River together in the 1840s.
dc.publisher Dover Publications
dc.contributor Mark Twain
dc.date 05-26-1994 W3CDTF
dc.type Text DCMIType
dc.format Softcover book, 224 pages long, 0.8 x 5.2 x 8.5 in.
dc.identifier ISBN-13 978-0486280615
dc.source http://www.amazon.com/Adventures-Huckleberry-Finn-Mark-Twain/dp/0486280616/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1461605489&sr=1-1&keywords=huckleberry+finn
dc.language en-US RFC4646
dc.relation The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain; originally published by Charles L. Webster and Co., New York: 1885
dc.coverage 1885-1994
dc.rights All rights reserved

 

“The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” tells the story of Huck Finn, a white boy who runs away from his abusive father with Jim, a runaway slave. Together, the two travel down the Mississippi River on a raft, encountering racism and attitudes toward slavery and freedom in the American South of the 1840s. Despite its negative attitude toward slavery, the book has been frequently banned for racism and offensive language (Banned Books Week) due to Twain’s unflinching portrayal of 1840s Missouri and the realities of slavery.

 

Works cited: “Banned Books That Shaped America.” Bannedbooksweek.org. Web. 25 Apr. 2016. http://www.bannedbooksweek.org/censorship/bannedbooksthatshapedamerica