The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

Element Value Value Standard
dc.title The Catcher in the Rye
dc.creator Salinger, J.D. (Jerome David), 1919-2010
dc.subject Caulfield, Holden (Fictitious character)- Fiction.; Runaway teenagers- Fiction.; New York (N.Y.)- Fiction. LCSH
dc.description Anyone who has read J.D. Salinger’s New Yorker stories–particularly A Perfect Day for Bananafish, Uncle Wiggily in Connecticut, The Laughing Man, and For Esme With Love and Squalor–will not be surprised by the fact that his first novel is full of children. The hero-narrator of The Catcher in the Rye is an ancient child of sixteen, a native New Yorker named Holden Caulfield. Through circumstances that tend to preclude adult, secondhand description, he leaves his prep school in Pennsylvania and goes underground in New York City for three days. The boy himself is at once too simple and too complex for us to make any final comment about him or his story. Perhaps the safest thing we can say about Holden is that he was born in the world not just strongly attracted to beauty but, almost, hopelessly impaled on it.
There are many voices in this novel: children’s voices, adult voices, underground voices-but Holden’s voice is the most eloquent of all. Transcending his own vernacular, yet remaining marvelously faithful to it, he issues a perfectly articulated cry of mixed pain and pleasure. However, like most lovers and clowns and poets of the higher orders, he keeps most of the pain to, and for, himself. The pleasure he gives away, or sets aside, with all his heart. It is there for the reader who can handle it to keep.
dc.publisher Back Bay Books
dc.contributor J.D. Salinger
dc.date 2001-01-30 W3CDTF
dc.type Text DCMIType
dc.format Paperback book; 288 pages; 5.2 x 0.9 x 8 in.
dc.identifier ISBN-13: 978-0316769174 ISBN
dc.source http://www.amazon.com/Catcher-Rye-J-D-Salinger/dp/0316769177/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=
dc.language en-US RFC4646
dc.relation The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger; originally published by Little, Brown, and Company, New York: 1951
dc.coverage 1951-2001
dc.rights All rights reserved

The Catcher in the Rye follows Holden Caulfield’s three-day adventure home after flunking out of his preparatory school. Holden contemplates his life, and during his journey, he meets a variety of people. The novel also deals with complex issues of identity, belonging, loss, and connection. The Catcher in the Rye has been challenged, removed, and banned in my many schools due to a variety of reasons: profanity, obscenity, offensive language, prostitution, and many other reasons (American Library Association, n.d.).

American Library Association. (n.d.). Banned and/or challenged books from the Radcliffe Publishing Course top 100 novels of the 20th Century. Retrieved April 26, 2016, from http://www.ala.org/Template.cfm?Section=bbwlinks

The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls

Element Value Value Standard
dc.title The Glass Castle: A Memoir
dc.creator Walls, Jeannette
dc.subject Children of alcoholics- United States- Biography.; Dysfunctional families- United States- Case studies.; Poor- West Virginia- Welch- Biography LCSH
dc.description Jeannette Walls grew up with parents whose ideals and stubborn nonconformity were both their curse and their salvation. Rex and Rose Mary Walls had four children. In the beginning, they lived like nomads, moving among Southwest desert towns, camping in the mountains. Rex was a charismatic, brilliant man who, when sober, captured his children’s imagination, teaching them physics, geology, and above all, how to embrace life fearlessly. Rose Mary, who painted and wrote and couldn’t stand the responsibility of providing for her family, called herself an “excitement addict.” Cooking a meal that would be consumed in fifteen minutes had no appeal when she could make a painting that might last forever. Later, when the money ran out, or the romance of the wandering life faded, the Walls retreated to the dismal West Virginia mining town — and the family — Rex Walls had done everything he could to escape. He drank. He stole the grocery money and disappeared for days. As the dysfunction of the family escalated, Jeannette and her brother and sisters had to fend for themselves, supporting one another as they weathered their parents’ betrayals and, finally, found the resources and will to leave home. What is so astonishing about Jeannette Walls is not just that she had the guts and tenacity and intelligence to get out, but that she describes her parents with such deep affection and generosity. Hers is a story of triumph against all odds, but also a tender, moving tale of unconditional love in a family that despite its profound flaws gave her the fiery determination to carve out a successful life on her own terms.
dc.publisher Scribner
dc.contributor Jeannette Walls
dc.date 2006-01-17 W3CDTF
dc.type Text DCMIType
dc.format Paperback book; 288 pages; 5.2 x 0.7 x 8 in.
dc.identifier ISBN-13: 978-0743247542 ISBN
dc.source http://www.amazon.com/Glass-Castle-Memoir-Jeannette-Walls/dp/074324754X/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=
dc.language en-US RFC4646
dc.relation The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls; originally published by Scribner, New York: 2005
dc.coverage 2005-2006
dc.rights All rights reserved

The Glass Castle is a memoir of Jeannette Walls’ life. The book recounts the unconventional, poverty stricken upbringing she and her siblings had due to their dysfunctional parents. Walls’ experienced a tragic upbringing until she was able to move to New York City with her siblings to try to make a living for herself. The Glass Castle has been challenge a number of times, the first in 2010 at a high school in California. The various reasons for the challenges are: profanity, criticism of Christianity, drunkenness, and accounts of sexual abuse and prostitution (Marshall University Libraries, 2015).

Marshall University Libraries. (2015, August 21). Banned books: The Glass Castle. Retrieved April 26, 2016, from http://www.marshall.edu/library/bannedbooks/books/glasscastle.asp