I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou

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dc.title I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings
dc.creator Angelou, Maya
dc.subject Autobiography; Blacks–United States; Racism–United States; Statutory rape; Sexually abused children; Motherhood. LCSH
dc.description I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings is a 1969 autobiography about the early years of American writer and poet Maya Angelou.
dc.publisher Random House
dc.date 1969 W3CDTF
dc.type Text DCMIType
dc.format Paperback; 304 pages; 5-⅝ x 8-¼ in.
dc.identifier ISBN: 978-0812980028
dc.source http://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/3924/i-know-why-the-caged-bird-sings-by-maya-angelou/9780812980028/
dc.language en-US RFC4646
dc.relation I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou; originally published by Random House; New York, 1969.
dc.rights Maya Angelou

Angelou’s autobiographical work has been challenged in 15 states. It is frequently banned or challenged in high schools and junior high schools. Censors cite its sexually explicit scenes, use of language, and religious depictions.
http://www.ala.org/bbooks/100-most-frequently-challenged-books-1990%E2%80%931999

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

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dc.title To Kill a Mockingbird
dc.creator Lee, Harper, 1926-2016
dc.subject Racism, Lawyers, Fathers and daughters, Race relations LCSH
dc.description A young girl experiences prejudice in the South as her father, a lawyer, defends a black man wrongly accused of a crime.
dc.publisher Harper Perennial Modern Classics
dc.date 03-01-2004 W3CDTF
dc.type Text DCMIType
dc.format Paperback book, 385 pages, 1 x 5.2 x 8.2 in.
dc.identifier ISBN-13 978-0060935467
dc.source http://www.amazon.com/Kill-Mockingbird-Harper-Lee/dp/0060935464/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=
dc.language en-US RFC4646
dc.relation To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee; originally published by Lippincott & Co., Philadelphia: July 11, 1960
dc.rights Harper Lee

 

To Kill a Mockingbird shows a young girl learning about prejudice and racism for the first time when her father, a lawyer in their small southern town, defends a black man wrongly accused of rape. It has been challenged or banned consistently since it came out for various reasons. The most common are vulgar language and sexual content, racial slurs, and the idea that it promotes institutionalized racism. Almost 60 years after it was first published, To Kill a Mockingbird remains one of the most commonly banned classic novels.

http://www.ala.org/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks/classics/reasons

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/to-kill-a-mockingbird-remains-among-top-banned-classical-novels/

The Color Purple by Alice Walker

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dc.title The Color Purple
dc.creator Walker, Alice
dc.subject Fiction – African-American, Fiction – Woman, Fiction – Bigotry, Fiction – incest, Fiction – sexual abuse, Fiction – abuse, Fiction – Africa, Fiction – Missionary, Fiction – Sisters, Fiction – South, Rural, Fiction – Purple
dc.description An epic tale spanning forty years in the life of Celie, an African-American woman living in the South who survives incredible abuse and bigotry. After Celie’s abusive father marries her off to the equally debasing “Mister” Albert Johnson, things go from bad to worse, leaving Celie to find companionship anywhere she can. She perseveres, holding on to her dream of one day being reunited with her sister in Africa.
dc.publisher Mariner Books
dc.contributor Alice Walker
dc.date June 4, 1905
dc.type Text
dc.format Paperback, 300 pages,  5.3 x 0.7 x 8 inches
dc.identifier 860-1417533253 IBSN
dc.source http://www.amazon.com/Color-Purple-Alice-Walker/dp/0156028352/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1462125592&sr=8-1&keywords=the+color+purple+book
dc.language en-USA
dc.relation The Color Purple by Alice Walker, originally published by Mariner Books, 1982
dc.rights All Rights Reserved

The Color Purple by Alice Walker, published in 1982, is told in a series of letters.  It won the 1983 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and The National Book Award for Fiction.The  story begins in the early 1900s in rural Georgia, and covers about 30 years.

The first two sentences in the book are, “You better not never tell nobody but God. It’d kill your mammy”.

Then begins fourteen-year-old Celie’s letters to God. She tells him she’s always been a good girl, and asks for a sign to let her know what is happening to her.

As she tells her story to God, we learn that she is raped repeatedly by the man she believes to be her father. She has had two babies by him, a girl and a boy.  Both babies were taken from her shortly after birth, and Celie believes that her her “Pa” killed the first one, and maybe sold the second one.

Celie’s mother asks who the father of the first one is. Celie tells her it’s God. Her mother dies before the second baby is born. Celie begins to worry about her younger sister, Nettie, when she sees Pa’s growing interest in her.  An older man with four children, whose wife is dead, wants to marry her, but Pa won’t hear of it. He offers Celie instead, and a cow to go along with her if the man will agree to take her.

It takes him a few months to make up his mind, but he finally decides he will take Celie. They marry, and she puts up with his bad treatment of her without complaint.

The Color Purple has plenty of critics. It’s often targeted by censors for its “troubling ideas about race relations”, “man’s relationship to God”, African history, human sexuality, extreme and graphic violence, offensive language, and “unsuited to age group”.

The Color Purple. Retrieved 01 May 2016 from http://www.favorite-banned-books.com/the-color-purple.html

The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls

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dc.title The Glass Castle: A Memoir
dc.creator Walls, Jeannette
dc.subject Children of alcoholics- United States- Biography.; Dysfunctional families- United States- Case studies.; Poor- West Virginia- Welch- Biography LCSH
dc.description Jeannette Walls grew up with parents whose ideals and stubborn nonconformity were both their curse and their salvation. Rex and Rose Mary Walls had four children. In the beginning, they lived like nomads, moving among Southwest desert towns, camping in the mountains. Rex was a charismatic, brilliant man who, when sober, captured his children’s imagination, teaching them physics, geology, and above all, how to embrace life fearlessly. Rose Mary, who painted and wrote and couldn’t stand the responsibility of providing for her family, called herself an “excitement addict.” Cooking a meal that would be consumed in fifteen minutes had no appeal when she could make a painting that might last forever. Later, when the money ran out, or the romance of the wandering life faded, the Walls retreated to the dismal West Virginia mining town — and the family — Rex Walls had done everything he could to escape. He drank. He stole the grocery money and disappeared for days. As the dysfunction of the family escalated, Jeannette and her brother and sisters had to fend for themselves, supporting one another as they weathered their parents’ betrayals and, finally, found the resources and will to leave home. What is so astonishing about Jeannette Walls is not just that she had the guts and tenacity and intelligence to get out, but that she describes her parents with such deep affection and generosity. Hers is a story of triumph against all odds, but also a tender, moving tale of unconditional love in a family that despite its profound flaws gave her the fiery determination to carve out a successful life on her own terms.
dc.publisher Scribner
dc.contributor Jeannette Walls
dc.date 2006-01-17 W3CDTF
dc.type Text DCMIType
dc.format Paperback book; 288 pages; 5.2 x 0.7 x 8 in.
dc.identifier ISBN-13: 978-0743247542 ISBN
dc.source http://www.amazon.com/Glass-Castle-Memoir-Jeannette-Walls/dp/074324754X/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=
dc.language en-US RFC4646
dc.relation The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls; originally published by Scribner, New York: 2005
dc.coverage 2005-2006
dc.rights All rights reserved

The Glass Castle is a memoir of Jeannette Walls’ life. The book recounts the unconventional, poverty stricken upbringing she and her siblings had due to their dysfunctional parents. Walls’ experienced a tragic upbringing until she was able to move to New York City with her siblings to try to make a living for herself. The Glass Castle has been challenge a number of times, the first in 2010 at a high school in California. The various reasons for the challenges are: profanity, criticism of Christianity, drunkenness, and accounts of sexual abuse and prostitution (Marshall University Libraries, 2015).

Marshall University Libraries. (2015, August 21). Banned books: The Glass Castle. Retrieved April 26, 2016, from http://www.marshall.edu/library/bannedbooks/books/glasscastle.asp