Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut


Element Value Value Standard
dc.title Slaughterhouse-Five
dc.creator Vonnegut, Kurt, 1922-2007
dc.subject World War, 1939-1945; Satire; Post-traumatic stress disorder LCSH
dc.description This satirical book shows an American soldier during World War II, suffering from PTSD and experiencing what he believes to be his former life through a series of flashbacks.
dc.publisher Dell 11-03-1991 W3CDTF
dc.type Text DCMIType
dc.format Paperback book, 215 pages, 4.1 x 0.6 x 6.8 in.
dc.identifier ISBN-13 978-0440180296
dc.language en-US RFC4646
dc.relation Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut; originally published by Delacorte; New York: 1969
dc.rights Kurt Vonnegut

Through flashbacks, this satirical anti-war book tells the story of a disoriented American soldier who believes himself to have experienced things like alien abduction and time travel before being taken prisoner by German soldiers. It has been consistently banned and challenged since its publication in 1969 for being “depraved,” “vulgar,” “anti-Christian” and “anti-American,” as well as containing explicit sexual content.

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie

Element Value Value Standard
dc.title The Absolutely True Diary of A Part-time Indian
dc.creator Alexie, Sherman
dc.subject Fiction – Native America, Fiction – Indian, Fiction – Reservation, Fiction – Teenage Boys, Fiction – Race relations, Fiction – alcoholism, Fiction – cartoonist
dc.description Junior is a budding cartoonist growing up on the Spokane Indian Reservation. Determined to take his future into his own hands, Junior leaves his troubled school on the rez to attend an all-white farm town high school where the only other Indian is the school mascot.
dc.publisher Little Brown Books for Young Readers
dc.contributor Sherman Alexie and Ellen Forney – Illustrator September 12, 2007
dc.type Text
dc.format Hardcover, 240 pages, 5.8 x 0.9 x 8.5 inches
dc.identifier 978-0316013680 ISBN
dc.language en-US
dc.relation The Absolutely True Diary of A Part-time Indian by Sherman Alexie, September 12, 2007
dc.rights All rights reserved

Arnold Spirit, a goofy-looking dork with a decent jumpshot, spends his time lamenting life on the “poor-ass” Spokane Indian reservation, drawing cartoons (which accompany, and often provide more insight than, the narrative), and, along with his aptly named pal Rowdy, laughing those laughs over anything and nothing that affix best friends so intricately together. When a teacher pleads with Arnold to want more, to escape the hopelessness of the rez, Arnold switches to a rich white school and immediately becomes as much an outcast in his own community as he is a curiosity in his new one. He weathers the typical teenage indignations and triumphs like a champ but soon faces far more trying ordeals as his home life begins to crumble and decay amidst the suffocating mire of alcoholism on the reservation

From the Huffington Post on a school in Idaho that has banned the book:

The school board’s decision to seek an alternative book to convey “the cultural messages” of Alexie’s work came after complaints from parents that the book contained sexually charged material inappropriate for their children, was peppered with pejorative terms for women, people of various races and those with learning disabilities and mocked Christian beliefs.

Descriptions retrieved 01 May 2016 from: and

Idaho bans native american book. Huffington Post. Retrieved 01 May 2016:

The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls

Element Value Value Standard
dc.title The Glass Castle: A Memoir
dc.creator Walls, Jeannette
dc.subject Children of alcoholics- United States- Biography.; Dysfunctional families- United States- Case studies.; Poor- West Virginia- Welch- Biography LCSH
dc.description Jeannette Walls grew up with parents whose ideals and stubborn nonconformity were both their curse and their salvation. Rex and Rose Mary Walls had four children. In the beginning, they lived like nomads, moving among Southwest desert towns, camping in the mountains. Rex was a charismatic, brilliant man who, when sober, captured his children’s imagination, teaching them physics, geology, and above all, how to embrace life fearlessly. Rose Mary, who painted and wrote and couldn’t stand the responsibility of providing for her family, called herself an “excitement addict.” Cooking a meal that would be consumed in fifteen minutes had no appeal when she could make a painting that might last forever. Later, when the money ran out, or the romance of the wandering life faded, the Walls retreated to the dismal West Virginia mining town — and the family — Rex Walls had done everything he could to escape. He drank. He stole the grocery money and disappeared for days. As the dysfunction of the family escalated, Jeannette and her brother and sisters had to fend for themselves, supporting one another as they weathered their parents’ betrayals and, finally, found the resources and will to leave home. What is so astonishing about Jeannette Walls is not just that she had the guts and tenacity and intelligence to get out, but that she describes her parents with such deep affection and generosity. Hers is a story of triumph against all odds, but also a tender, moving tale of unconditional love in a family that despite its profound flaws gave her the fiery determination to carve out a successful life on her own terms.
dc.publisher Scribner
dc.contributor Jeannette Walls 2006-01-17 W3CDTF
dc.type Text DCMIType
dc.format Paperback book; 288 pages; 5.2 x 0.7 x 8 in.
dc.identifier ISBN-13: 978-0743247542 ISBN
dc.language en-US RFC4646
dc.relation The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls; originally published by Scribner, New York: 2005
dc.coverage 2005-2006
dc.rights All rights reserved

The Glass Castle is a memoir of Jeannette Walls’ life. The book recounts the unconventional, poverty stricken upbringing she and her siblings had due to their dysfunctional parents. Walls’ experienced a tragic upbringing until she was able to move to New York City with her siblings to try to make a living for herself. The Glass Castle has been challenge a number of times, the first in 2010 at a high school in California. The various reasons for the challenges are: profanity, criticism of Christianity, drunkenness, and accounts of sexual abuse and prostitution (Marshall University Libraries, 2015).

Marshall University Libraries. (2015, August 21). Banned books: The Glass Castle. Retrieved April 26, 2016, from

Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret. by Judy Blume

Element Value Value Standard
dc.title Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret.
dc.creator Blume, Judy
dc.subject Teenage girls- Fiction.; Religions- Juvenile fiction.; Conduct of life- Juvenile fiction.; Puberty- Juvenile fiction. LCSH
dc.description Margaret shares her secrets and her spirituality in this iconic Judy Blume novel, beloved by millions, that now has a fresh new look. Margaret Simon, almost twelve, likes long hair, tuna fish, the smell of rain, and things that are pink. She’s just moved from New York City to Farbook, New Jersey, and is anxious to fit in with her new friends—Nancy, Gretchen, and Janie. When they form a secret club to talk about private subjects like boys, bras, and getting their first periods, Margaret is happy to belong. But none of them can believe Margaret doesn’t have religion, and that she isn’t going to the Y or the Jewish Community Center. What they don’t know is Margaret has her own very special relationship with God. She can talk to God about everything—family, friends, even Moose Freed, her secret crush. Margaret is funny and real, and her thoughts and feelings are oh-so-relatable—you’ll feel like she’s talking right to you, sharing her secrets with a friend.
dc.publisher Atheneum Books for Young Readers
dc.contributor Judy Blume 2014-04-29 W3CDTF
dc.type Text DCMIType
dc.format Paperback book; 192 pages; 5.1 x 0.6 x 7.6 in.
dc.identifier ISBN-13: 978-1481409933 ISBN
dc.language en-US RFC4646
dc.relation Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret. by Judy Blume; originally published by Yearling, New York: 1970
dc.coverage 1970-2014
dc.rights All rights reserved

Margaret Simon, an almost 12-year-old girl, deals with moving to a new town and all the trials and tribulations that come with puberty: bras, periods, and boys. On top of it all, Margaret deals with her mixed religious heritage. Judy Blume has written several books that are often challenged; from 1990-1999, she had five books on the “100 Most Frequently Challenged Books” list (American Library Association, n.d.). Reasons for its frequent challenges include: sexually offensive, amoral/immoral, profane, and anti-Christian (Half Price Books, n.d.).

American Library Association. (n.d.). 100 most frequently challenged books: 1990–1999. Retrieved April 26, 2016, from–1999

Half Price Books. (n.d.). Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret. Retrieved April 26, 2016, from