Children’s and YA Fiction

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian  by Sherman Alexie

Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret by Judy Blume

Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson

Drama  by Raina Telgemeier

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling

Heather Has Two Mommies  by Leslea Newman

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

Sylvester and the Magic Pebble by William Steig

 

Adult Fiction

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

Beloved by Toni Morrison

The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

The Color Purple  by Alice Walker

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell

The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison

Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov

Lord of the Flies by William Golding

The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold

Nineteen eighty-four (1984)  by George Orwell

The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne

A Separate Peace by John Knowles

Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut

Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison

 

Element Value Value Standard
dc.title Invisible Man
dc.creator Ellison, Ralph
dc.subject African Americans; Blacks–United States; Racism–United States; America–Race relations. LCSH
dc.description Invisible Man is a novel by Ralph Ellison about an African American man whose color renders him invisible, published by Random House in 1952.
dc.publisher Random House
dc.date 1952 W3CDTF
dc.type Text DCMIType
dc.format Paperback; 581 pages; 5.2 x 0.9 x 7.9 in.
dc.identifier ISBN: 978-0679732761
dc.source http://www.amazon.com/Invisible-Man-Ralph-Ellison/dp/0679732764
dc.language en-US RFC4646
dc.relation Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison; originally published by Random House; New York: 1952.
dc.rights Ralph Ellison

Ellison’s first novel, which masterfully recounts the experiences of an unnamed black narrator who navigates life in the South and then in New York City, has been challenged or banned in schools since it’s publication in 1952. The most common reasons cited for banning are: obscene language, sexual content, and violence. An un-cited reason may be Ellison’s honest and unflinching portrayal of racism in America.

http://www.ala.org/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks/classics/reasons

http://articles.latimes.com/2013/sep/19/entertainment/la-et-jc-ralph-ellison-invisible-man-banned-north-carolina-20130919

 

Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut

 

Element Value Value Standard
dc.title Slaughterhouse-Five
dc.creator Vonnegut, Kurt, 1922-2007
dc.subject World War, 1939-1945; Satire; Post-traumatic stress disorder LCSH
dc.description This satirical book shows an American soldier during World War II, suffering from PTSD and experiencing what he believes to be his former life through a series of flashbacks.
dc.publisher Dell
dc.date 11-03-1991 W3CDTF
dc.type Text DCMIType
dc.format Paperback book, 215 pages, 4.1 x 0.6 x 6.8 in.
dc.identifier ISBN-13 978-0440180296
dc.source http://www.amazon.com/Slaughterhouse-Five-Kurt-Vonnegut/dp/0440180295/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1462158574&sr=8-1&keywords=slaughterhouse+five 
dc.language en-US RFC4646
dc.relation Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut; originally published by Delacorte; New York: 1969
dc.rights Kurt Vonnegut

Through flashbacks, this satirical anti-war book tells the story of a disoriented American soldier who believes himself to have experienced things like alien abduction and time travel before being taken prisoner by German soldiers. It has been consistently banned and challenged since its publication in 1969 for being “depraved,” “vulgar,” “anti-Christian” and “anti-American,” as well as containing explicit sexual content.

http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2011/08/the-neverending-campaign-to-ban-slaughterhouse-five/243525/

http://www.ala.org/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks/classics/reasons

Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

Element Value Value Standard
dc.title Their Eyes Were Watching God
dc.creator Hurston, Zora Neale, 1891-1960
dc.subject Racism; Marriage-Fiction; Southern States; African American Women LCSH
dc.description An extended flashback as the main character, Janie, tells the story of her life. She goes through marriages to three different men, the last of which was finally a happy one, while dealing with violence and racism as an African-American woman in the early 1900’s South.
dc.publisher Harper Perennial Modern Classics
dc.contributor Henry Louis Gates Jr.; Edwidge Danticat
dc.date 05-30-2006 W3CDTF
dc.type Text DCMIType
dc.format Paperback book, 219 pages, 5.5 x 0.6 x 8.2 in.
dc.identifier ISBN-13 978-0061120060
dc.source http://www.amazon.com/Their-Eyes-Were-Watching-God/dp/0061120065/ref=sr_1_1_twi_pap_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1461872392&sr=1-1&keywords=their+eyes+were+watching+god+book
dc.language en-US RFC4646
dc.relation Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston; originally published by J. B.
Lippincott; Philadelphia: September 18, 1937
dc.rights Zora Neale Hurston

Janie tells a friend the story of her life and struggles throughout her three marriages, beginning when she is sixteen and ending in her forties after losing her third husband. This is generally banned from high schools due to language and sexually explicit content, as well as some violence between Janie and her husbands.

http://www.ala.org/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks/classics/reasons

Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell

Element Value Value Standard
dc.title Gone With the Wind
dc.creator Mitchell, Margaret, 1900-1949
dc.subject Coming of age- Fiction; Slavery;  Slavery in Literature; United States–History–Civil War, 1861-1865 LCSH
dc.description In this “epic novel of love and war,” Scarlett O’Hara, the spoiled daughter of a plantation owner, must survive on her own and find a way out of poverty in the Civil War South.
dc.publisher Macmillan
dc.date 1964 W3CDTF
dc.type Text DCMIType
dc.format Hardcover book, 833 pages, 8.5 x 5.9 x 1.9 in.
dc.identifier ISBN-13 978-0025853904
dc.source http://www.amazon.com/Gone-Wind-Margaret-Mitchell/dp/B000GISOGS/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1461871698&sr=8-5&keywords=gone+with+the+wind
dc.language en-US RFC4646
dc.relation Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell; originally published by Macmillan Publishers; New York: June 10, 1936
dc.rights Margaret Mitchell

Gone with the Wind follows the struggles of Scarlett O’Hara during and after the Civil War, as well as her on-again, off-again relationships with Ashley Wilkes and Rhett Butler. Many people have the opinion that Gone with the Wind should be banned due to racial slurs, as well as the underlying racism in both the way slaves were treated by the characters and portrayed by the narrative.

http://www.csmonitor.com/Books/2011/0928/20-banned-books-that-may-surprise-you/Gone-with-the-Wind-by-Margaret-Mitchell

https://prezi.com/kdkcv_ww67je/why-is-gone-with-the-wind-banned-and-challenged/

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

Element Value Value Standard
dc.title To Kill a Mockingbird
dc.creator Lee, Harper, 1926-2016
dc.subject Racism, Lawyers, Fathers and daughters, Race relations LCSH
dc.description A young girl experiences prejudice in the South as her father, a lawyer, defends a black man wrongly accused of a crime.
dc.publisher Harper Perennial Modern Classics
dc.date 03-01-2004 W3CDTF
dc.type Text DCMIType
dc.format Paperback book, 385 pages, 1 x 5.2 x 8.2 in.
dc.identifier ISBN-13 978-0060935467
dc.source http://www.amazon.com/Kill-Mockingbird-Harper-Lee/dp/0060935464/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=
dc.language en-US RFC4646
dc.relation To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee; originally published by Lippincott & Co., Philadelphia: July 11, 1960
dc.rights Harper Lee

 

To Kill a Mockingbird shows a young girl learning about prejudice and racism for the first time when her father, a lawyer in their small southern town, defends a black man wrongly accused of rape. It has been challenged or banned consistently since it came out for various reasons. The most common are vulgar language and sexual content, racial slurs, and the idea that it promotes institutionalized racism. Almost 60 years after it was first published, To Kill a Mockingbird remains one of the most commonly banned classic novels.

http://www.ala.org/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks/classics/reasons

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/to-kill-a-mockingbird-remains-among-top-banned-classical-novels/